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K-MENS

K-MENS ayurvedic medicine regulates uterine disorders in a Natural way. It is used in the treatment of the following diseases:

1) Menorrhalgia

Menorrhagia is an abnormally heavy and prolonged menstrual period at regular intervals.

A normal menstrual cycle is 21–35 days in duration, with bleeding lasting an average of 5 days and total blood flow between 25 and 80 ml. A blood loss of greater than 80 ml or lasting longer than 7 days constitutes menorrhagia (also called hypermenorrhea). Some women suffering from menorrhagia, experience heavy blood loss every period and feel cramping, which makes it difficult to maintain normal daily activities.

The signs and symptoms of menorrhagia may include:

  1. 1) Menstrual flow that soaks through one or more sanitary pads or tampons every hour for several consecutive hours
  2. 2) The need to use double sanitary protection to control your menstrual flow
  3. 3) The need to change sanitary protection during the night
  4. 4) Menstrual periods lasting longer than seven days
  5. 5) Menstrual flow that includes large blood clots
  6. 6) Heavy menstrual flow that interferes with your regular lifestyle
  7. 7) Tiredness, fatigue or shortness of breath (symptoms of anemia)/

Many different conditions may cause menorrhagia. Common causes include:

  1. 1)Hormonal imbalance: In a normal menstrual cycle, a balance between the hormones estrogen and progesterone regulates the build-up of the lining of the uterus (endometrium), which is shed during menstruation. If a hormonal imbalance occurs, the endometrium develops in excess and eventually sheds by way of heavy menstrual bleeding.
  2. 2) Dysfunction of the ovaries: Lack of ovulation (anovulation) may cause hormonal imbalance and result in menorrhagia.
  3. 3) Uterine fibroids: These noncancerous (benign) tumors of the uterus appear during your childbearing years. Uterine fibroids may cause heavier than normal or prolonged menstrual bleeding.
  4. 4) Adenomyosis: This condition occurs when glands from the endometrium become embedded in the uterine muscle, often causing heavy bleeding and pain. Adenomyosis is most likely to develop if you're a middle-aged woman who has had many children.
  5. 5) Intrauterine device (IUD): Menorrhagia is a well-known side effect of using a nonhormonal intrauterine device for birth control. When an IUD is the cause of excessive menstrual bleeding, you may need to remove it.
  6. 6) Medications: Certain drugs, including anti-inflammatory medications and anticoagulants (to prevent blood clots), can contribute to heavy or prolonged menstrual bleeding. Improper use of hormone medications also can cause menorrhagia.
  7. 7) Other medical conditions: A number of other medical conditions, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), thyroid problems, endometriosis, and liver or kidney disease, may cause menorrhagia.
2) Dysmenorrhea

Dysmenorrhea can feature different kinds of pain, including sharp, throbbing, dull, nauseating, burning, or shooting pain.

Dysmenorrhea is a gynaecological medical condition characterized by severe uterine pain during menstruation. While most women experience minor pain during menstruation, dysmenorrhea is diagnosed when the pain is so severe as to limit normal activities, or require medication. Dysmenorrhea may precede menstruation by several days or may accompany it, and it usually subsides as menstruation tapers off. Dysmenorrhea may coexist with excessively heavy blood loss, known as menorrhagia.

The main symptom of dysmenorrhea is pain concentrated in the lower abdomen, in the umbilical region or the suprapubic region of the abdomen. It is also commonly felt in the right or left abdomen. It may radiate to the thighs and lower back. Other symptoms may include nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea or constipation, headache, dizziness, disorientation, hypersensitivity to sound, light, smell and touch, fainting, and fatigue. Symptoms of dysmenorrhea often begin immediately following ovulation and can last until the end of menstruation. This is because dysmenorrhea is often associated with changes in hormonal levels in the body that occur with ovulation.

During menstrual periods, your uterus contracts to help expel its lining. Prostaglandins, hormone-like substances involved in pain and inflammation, trigger the uterine muscle contractions. Higher levels of prostaglandins are associated with more severe menstrual cramps. Menstrual cramps also may be caused by:

  1. 1) Endometriosis: In this painful condition, the type of tissue that lines your uterus becomes implanted outside your uterus, most commonly on your fallopian tubes or the tissue lining your pelvis.
  2. 2) Uterine fibroids: These noncancerous tumors and growths in the wall of the uterus may be the cause of pain.
  3. 3) Adenomyosis: In this condition, the tissue that lines your uterus begins to grow into the muscular walls of the uterus.
  4. 4) Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID): This infection of the female reproductive organs is usually caused by sexually transmitted bacteria.
  5. 5) Cervical stenosis: In some women, the opening of the cervix may be so small that it impedes menstrual flow, causing a painful increase of pressure within the uterus.

3) Amenorrhoea

Amenorrhoea (or Amenorrhea) is the absence of menstruation — one or more missed menstrual periods.

Primary amenorrhea refers to no menstrual periods by age 16. Secondary amenorrhea occurs when you were previously menstruating, but then stopped having periods. If you're sexually active and otherwise healthy, pregnancy is the most likely reason you've missed a period. Besides pregnancy, there are many other possible explanations for amenorrhea. A sign, not a disease, amenorrhea seldom results from a serious condition. However, not having regular menstruation can be stressful, and the time spent waiting for it to recur may feel like a lifetime. The main indication of amenorrhea is that you don't have menstrual periods:

  1. 1) In primary amenorrhea, you have no menstrual period by age 16.
  2. 2) In secondary amenorrhea, you have no periods for three to six months or longer.

Depending on the cause of amenorrhea, you might experience other signs or symptoms along with the absence of periods, such as milky nipple discharge, headache, vision changes, or excessive hair growth on your face and torso (hirsutism).

Secondary amenorrhea is more common than primary amenorrhea. Many possible causes of secondary amenorrhea exist:
1) Stress: Mental stress can temporarily alter the functioning of your hypothalamus — an area of your brain that controls the hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle. Ovulation and menstruation may stop as a result.
2) Medication: Certain medications can cause menstrual periods to stop. For example, antidepressants, antipsychotics, some chemotherapy drugs and oral corticosteroids can cause amenorrhea.
3) Hormonal imbalance: A common cause of amenorrhea or irregular periods is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This condition causes relatively high and sustained levels of estrogen and androgen, a male hormone, rather than the fluctuating levels seen in the normal menstrual cycle. This results in a decrease in the pituitary hormones that lead to ovulation and menstruation. PCOS is associated with obesity; amenorrhea or abnormal, often heavy, uterine bleeding; acne; and sometimes excess facial hair.
4) Low body weight: Excessively low body weight interrupts many hormonal functions in your body, potentially halting ovulation. Women who have an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia, often stop having periods because of these abnormal hormonal changes.
5) Excessive exercise: Women who participate in sports that require rigorous training, such as ballet, long-distance running or gymnastics, may find their menstrual cycle interrupted. Several factors combine to contribute to the loss of periods in athletes, including low body fat, stress and high energy expenditure.
6) Pituitary tumor: A noncancerous (benign) tumor in your pituitary gland (adenoma or prolactinoma) can cause an overproduction of prolactin. Excess prolactin can interfere with the regulation of menstruation.
7) Uterine scarring: A condition in which scar tissue builds up in the lining of the uterus, can sometimes occur after uterine procedures, such as a dilation and curettage (D and C), cesarean section or treatment for uterine fibroids. Uterine scarring prevents the normal buildup and shedding of the uterine lining, which can result in very light menstrual bleeding or no periods at all.
8) Primary ovarian insufficiency: Menopause usually occurs between ages 45 and 55. In some women, the ovarian supply of eggs diminishes before age 40, a condition known as primary ovarian insufficiency. The lack of ovarian function associated with this condition decreases the amount of circulating estrogen in your body, which in turn thins your uterine lining (endometrium) and brings an end to your menstrual periods. Primary ovarian insufficiency, also referred to as premature menopause, may result from genetic factors or autoimmune disease, but often no cause can be found.
9) Contraceptives: Some women who take birth control pills may not have periods. When oral contraceptives are stopped, it may take three to six months to resume regular ovulation and menstruation. Contraceptives that are injected or implanted, also may cause amenorrhea as can progesterone-containing intrauterine devices.

The most common causes of primary amenorrhea include:

1) Chromosomal abnormalities: Certain chromosomal abnormalities can cause a premature depletion of the eggs involved in ovulation and menstruation.
2) Problems with the hypothalamus: Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea is a disorder of the hypothalamus — an area at the base of your brain that acts as a control center for your body and regulates your menstrual cycle. Excessive exercise, eating disorders, such as anorexia, and physical or psychological stress can all contribute to a disruption in the normal function of the hypothalamus. Less commonly, a tumor may prevent your hypothalamus from functioning normally.
4) Oligomenorrhea

Oligomenorrhea (or oligomenorrhoea) is infrequent (or very light) menstruation.

More strictly, it is menstrual periods occurring at intervals of greater than 35 days, with only four to nine periods in a year. Oligomenorrhea usually occurs in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS is a condition in which the ovaries become filled with small cysts. Women with PCOS have slightly higher levels of male hormones, called androgens, which causes oligomenorrhea. Oligomenorrhea can also be caused by emotional and physical stress, chronic illnesses, tumors that secrete estrogen, poor nutrition, and eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa. Serious female athletes often develop oligomenorrhea because of their strict diets and intense physical activity. Female athletes who use anabolic steroid drugs to enhance their performance are also at risk of developing oligomenorrhea, as well as many other health problems. Oligomenorrhea can be caused by a hormonal imbalance. The start of menstruation during puberty and the length and regularity of the menstrual cycle is controlled by hormones produced in an area of the brain called the hypothalamus, as well as by the pituitary and adrenal glands. It is very common and normal for the hormone messages sent by these glands to be out of synch in teenagers who have just begun getting their periods.

The symptoms of oligomenorrhea include menstrual periods that occur at intervals of greater than 35 days, with only four to nine periods in a year. Some women with oligomenorrhea may have difficulty becoming pregnant. If low estrogen levels are contributing to the problem, the woman may be at risk for bone loss, called osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease. Women who do not have regular periods also have a higher risk of developing uterine cancer.

5) Premenstrual Syndrome

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) (also called PMT or premenstrual tension) is a collection of physical, psychological, and emotional symptoms related to a woman's menstrual cycle.

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) has a wide variety of symptoms, including mood swings, tender breasts, food cravings, fatigue, irritability and depression. An estimated 3 of every 4 menstruating women experience some form of premenstrual syndrome. These problems tend to peak in your late 20s and early 30s. Symptoms tend to recur in a predictable pattern. Yet the physical and emotional changes you experience with premenstrual syndrome may be particularly intense in some months and only slightly noticeable in others. Still, you don't have to let these problems control your life. Treatments and lifestyle adjustments can help you reduce or manage the signs and symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

The most common signs and symptoms associated with premenstrual syndrome include:
Emotional and behavioural symptoms:

1) Tension or anxiety
2) Depressed mood
3) Crying spells
4) Mood swings and irritability or anger
5) Appetite changes and food cravings
6) Trouble falling asleep (insomnia)
7) Social withdrawal
8) Poor concentration
Physical signs and symptoms:
1) Joint or muscle pain
2) Headache
3) Fatigue
4) Weight gain from fluid retention
5) Abdominal bloating
6) Breast tenderness
7) Acne flare-ups
8) Constipation or diarrhoea

Although the list of potential signs and symptoms is long, most women with premenstrual syndrome experience only a few of these problems. For some women, the physical pain and emotional stress are severe enough to affect their daily routines and activities. For most of the women, signs and symptoms disappear as the menstrual period begins. But a few women with premenstrual syndrome have disabling symptoms every month. This form of PMS has its own psychiatric designation — premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). PMDD is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome with signs and symptoms including severe depression, feelings of hopelessness, anger, anxiety, low self-esteem, difficulty concentrating, irritability and tension. A number of women with severe PMS may have an underlying psychiatric disorder.

Several factors may contribute to the PMS conditions:

1) Cyclic changes in hormones: Signs and symptoms of premenstrual syndrome change with hormonal fluctuations and disappear with pregnancy and menopause.
2) Chemical changes in the brain: Fluctuations of serotonin, a brain chemical (neurotransmitter) that is thought to play a crucial role in mood states, could trigger PMS symptoms. Insufficient amounts of serotonin may contribute to premenstrual depression, as well as to fatigue, food cravings and sleep problems.
3) Depression: Some women with severe premenstrual syndrome have undiagnosed depression, though depression alone does not cause all of the symptoms.
4) Stress: Stress can aggravate some of your PMS symptoms.
5) Poor eating habits: Some PMS symptoms have been linked to low levels of vitamins and minerals. Other possible contributors to PMS include eating a lot of salty foods, which may cause fluid retention, and drinking alcohol and caffeinated beverages, which may cause mood and energy level disturbances.
6) Leucorrhea

Leucorrhea or leukorrhea denotes a thick, whitish or yellowish vaginal discharge.

There are many causes of leukorrhea, the usual one being hormone imbalance. The amount of discharge may increase due to vaginal infection or STDs, in which case it becomes more yellow and foul-smelling. Vaginal discharge is normal for a woman, and all women are different. Causes of change in discharge include infection, malignancy, and hormonal changes. It is natural that there will be some white discharge till menopause but when it gains abnormal proportions it is treated as a disease. If it is not treated at early stage it will become chronic, turn critical and affect your life. It is a type of infection and women become lethargic and fall victims to excessive weakness. Other than this there is a pain in the lumber region and the calves, dragging sensation in the abdomen and frequent headaches.

The causes of excessive white discharge can be many. It is due to excessive hormonal disturbances. Sometimes people with improper hygienic conditions also get affected by the disease, so try to keep the vaginal region clean. This disease is also generated from improper feeding habits. Indigestion and constipation are also other causes of leucorrhea.

7) Uterine spasm

Leucorrhea or leukorrhea denotes a thick, whitish or yellowish vaginal discharge.

There are many causes of leukorrhea, the usual one being hormone imbalance. The amount of discharge may increase due to vaginal infection or STDs, in which case it becomes more yellow and foul-smelling. Vaginal discharge is normal for a woman, and all women are different. Causes of change in discharge include infection, malignancy, and hormonal changes. It is natural that there will be some white discharge till menopause but when it gains abnormal proportions it is treated as a disease. If it is not treated at early stage it will become chronic, turn critical and affect your life. It is a type of infection and women become lethargic and fall victims to excessive weakness. Other than this there is a pain in the lumber region and the calves, dragging sensation in the abdomen and frequent headaches.

The causes of excessive white discharge can be many. It is due to excessive hormonal disturbances. Sometimes people with improper hygienic conditions also get affected by the disease, so try to keep the vaginal region clean. This disease is also generated from improper feeding habits. Indigestion and constipation are also other causes of leucorrhea.

8) Other uterine discharges

Women face many types of discharges during menstruation like bleeding, yellow discharge, white discharge, etc.

These are caused by many different reasons and the Ashoka based K-MENS can be quite useful in the treatment of these discharges.

9) Anaemic condition during pregnancy

Pregnant women suffering from anaemic condition don't have enough healthy red blood cells to carry adequate oxygen to tissues.

Pregnancy doubles the amount of iron needed. Even women who are not pregnant need more iron than men; therefore it is important that pregnant women should take sufficient iron supplements. Anaemia during pregnancy, if not treated, may cause complications. Ashoka based K-MENS checks excessive blood loss during menstruation, uterine haemorrhage. K-MENS also arrests bleeding in pregnant women.

10) Vaginal PH

Vaginal PH level undergoes changes during the pregnancy.

Pregnant women can experience vaginal itching. The most common reason for vaginal itching during pregnancy is the normal changes to the vaginal PH level. K-MENS is very useful in bringing the Vaginal PH level to normal level.

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